Yelp Review Olek on Media Olek online Store

Is my vintage "Eames" Chair Real?



Common Reproductions, and the Vitra Lounge Chair also Licensed by Charles & Ray Eames to manufacture and sell in Europe


After the Eames Lounge chair appeared in stores in the late 1950's, competitors began to copy the chair's design features, with similar chairs produced primarily by Plycraft and Selig. They are easily distinguished from the Eames Lounge Chair by Herman Miller, and from the multitudes of knock-offs produced in China today.


Vitra also produces an Eames-licensed Lounge Chair in Europe, which sells for approximately three times the cost of the Herman Miller licensee Lounge Chair. The Vitra base design is different from Herman Miller's, see below:

 

Herman Miller Eames Chair Bases are unique among vintage reproductions:

Note the lack of a stem, the chair spider meets the base, with a concealed bushing between Note the lack of a stem, the chair spider meets the base, with a concealed bushing between


Note the lack of a stem, the chair spider meets the base, with a concealed bushing between

 

Selig Reproductions of Eames Lounge Chairs

The Selig reproduction of the Eames Lounge Chair, from the 1960's. No shock mounts, uses bolts through the outer shells and directly into the 1/16" thinner steel arms. Thicker shells than the Eames Herman Miller.  Different base, with typical office swivel chair spider mechanism.  Shown without cushions, to make differences more apparent. This chair has a single welting around the arm cushions, the Herman Miller Chair two lines of welting, top and bottom.

 

Vintage Segal reproduction has flared aluminum five star lounge base, similar four star ottoman base Vintage Segal reproduction has flared aluminum five star lounge base, similar four star ottoman base


Vintage Segal reproduction has flared aluminum five star lounge base, similar four star ottoman base

Back of this later Segal reproduction on R. looks most similar of the reproductions to the Herman Miller, even has neoprene shocks below the polished aluminum struts connecting upper & lower back Back of this later Segal reproduction on R. looks most similar of the reproductions to the Herman Miller, even has neoprene shocks below the polished aluminum struts connecting upper & lower back


Back of this later Segal reproduction on R. looks most similar of the reproductions to the Herman Miller, even has neoprene shocks below the polished aluminum struts connecting upper & lower back

 

Miller, even has neoprene shocks below the polished aluminum struts connecting upper & lower back Miller, even has neoprene shocks below the polished aluminum struts connecting upper & lower back


A later variant of the Segal base Midwood Manufacturing


Late Vintage Segal Base (above)


A later variant of the Segal base, more similar to the five star legs of the Herman Miller Base, with different conical swivel glides, and a notable stem not present in the Herman Miller chair. Some are marked "Midwood Manufacturing" on the round plate beneath the central post. Leg cross section also differs from Herman Miller. Note DF-9263   28" marking in casting.

 

Early Segal Reproduction Chair Base Early Segal Reproduction Chair Base


Early Segal Reproduction Chair Base with metatag


Early Segal Reproduction Chair Base with Base Mfr. nametag

The Plycraft Eames lounge Chair


The Plycraft Eames lounge Chair, from the 1960's. No shock mounts, uses bolts through the outer shell, and straps from the lower shell to both sides of the seat shell, and a third strap at the center of the back lower shell to the seat shell. A cheaper imitation than the Segal.  Tubular chromed base, and back supports, not cast brushed and painted aluminum like the Herman Miller, Vitra, and Segal chairs. No welting on arms.

 

Vitra Lounge Chair, the Charles & Ray Eames-licensed European manufacturer of their Lounge chair


Vitra Lounge Chair, the Charles & Ray Eames-licensed European manufacturer of their Lounge chair. Note the different base than the Herman Miller chair.