Millwork

COLLEGE & CHURCH MILLWORK

Olek Replicates historic millwork for Church and College buildings being restored. Millwork may have been destroyed by modernization, or fire. We precisely follow drawings to recreate the past designs, fabricating knives in our shop as needed to replicate all of the profiles needed. We have worked on single projects that have required as many as 100 pairs of knives. Lumber is carefully selected to match the original. Quarter sawn oak was often used in better millwork, or rift cut. The appearance is quarter sawn white oak, often called “tiger” oak for the striping pattern of its medullary rays, is quite different from the “cathedral” graining pattern found in flat-cut white oak. The patina of antique panelling may be precisely replicated by our artists, by combination of aniline dyes and pigmented stains. The new woodwork finish is carefully matched, and is indistinguishable next to centuries old paneling, even when joined directly to the old millwork.

More important than many realize, is replicating the joinery of the past. Mortise and tenon joinery was an integral part of traditional millwork, for good reason. It holds up to the stresses of use, for hundreds of years. Modern methods of joining woodwork, using dowels, biscuits, or nails will not hold up for many decades. Today another issue that comes up is using veneered MDF rather than solid lumber. Of course, using solid lumber is superior in every respect, except higher cost, to using MDF, which breaks apart under low stresses and minor damaging forces. Solid lumber is sometimes in conflict with the Fire Code, demanding fire-rated MDF instead of solid lumber.

Below are some examples of Olek’s Church or College millwork:

FORDHAM ROSE HILL CAMPUS- DWAYNE LIBRARY

ALL INTERIOR MILLWORK REPLACEMENT- 250,000 SF BLDG